How the Brain Creates the Experience of God

A very good article – among many others – from the blog victorianeuronotes.wordpress.com. About how our human brain functions and how it creates an experience – a sensed presence, or rather delusion – of divine beings.

Victoria Neuronotes’ blog is also full of valuable and important information about what is often called the religious trauma syndrome (RTS).

Victoria Neuronotes describes herself like this:

Victoria is a secular humanist and an advocate for human and animal rights, brain injury awareness, seizure disorders, and the environment. She blogs about the brain’s role in religious type experiences, and the numerous ways the environment impacts gene expression, brain development and human behavior.

BTW, here’s another blogger who is an expert on the religious trauma syndrome: Valerie Tarico. I strongly recommend blog too – see for example http://valerietarico.com/2013/03/26/religious-trauma-syndrome-is-it-real/ – for those of you who want to learn more about how dangerous and poisonous religions – or rather religious people – can be. And believe me, they ARE, indeed, dangerous.

Victoria NeuroNotes

Peter: When I used to read the Bible I sort of assumed that God spoke to the people of old in a very clear way that could not be misunderstood. Why didn’t he speak to me so clearly? A lot of people claim to hear from God now. However when really pressed on the matter,

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5 Comments

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5 responses to “How the Brain Creates the Experience of God

  1. All people can be dangerous, none are inherently so. Sorry to disagree on a piddling point ! Love your blog !

  2. Yes, of course you are right!

    But what I mean is that people who are looking for a meaning of their lives, maybe after a life crisis, often are sensitive and vulnerable to the message from religions and religious people. That’s why I warn of god believers (who feel that they have a special mission to teach the right faith of the right god).

    You don’t expect that meeting them is, more or less, equivalent of meeting the Serpent in the Garden of Eden. Those people absolutely know how to cheat and mislead you. That’s their job, their mission in life to do so. And THAT is the dangerous thing.

    Just think of scientologists, or why not Jehovah’s witnesses, and I hope you’ll understand my point of view better.

    They treat you like a V.I.P. – at least as long as you are interested in their message often said to be some very good news for you.

    You often turn to priests and other religious persons when you need some help and advice.

    Or maybe you choose to visit a psychic. But it’s (almost) the same. In my eyes, psychics are pseudo-religious persons. That is, the same shit, just another package.

    They all tell you that you are lucky to, at last, have found the right mentor, who can see your potential and understands what you need and declares that you belong to the chosen people.

    When you meet that type of persons you’d better know what is bullshit in their message and what is valuable “real” knowledge. The problem is you don’t. You are at a disadvantage when meeting such people. They are experts on how to persuade you and make you believe that they, just they, possess the one and only truth.

    That’s why I’m warning, especially, of religious people.

    BTW, I hope you know that there is a STRONG positive correlation between religious fervor and intolerance.

    There are experiments showing that if you use a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) tool to lower the religious ardor in an individual, then that person becomes more tolerant, less homophobic, less xenophobic and so on. And if you increase the religious zeal, then the intolerant views of that person are rising at the same time.

    I think that such experiments tell us a lot about the “evolution” of religion(s).

  3. Thank you so much for the reblog. You inspire and encourage me and I am humbled. I’ve needed to take a break, but will be back blogging soon. Thanks again. 🙂

  4. Victoria, we all need to take a time-out, or a break, now and then.

    BTW, I want you to know that I’m really longing for your come back in the blogosphere.

    To paraphrase what Sir Winston Churchill once said: Never in the field of religious conflicts and disasters is so much owed, by so many, to you and your blogs, Victoria.

    You are as brave and helpful as you are clever and intelligent!

    I lift my sombrero in order to honor you.

    You are, indeed, outstanding!

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